ProteinSimple Grant Recipients

Ella

David M. Briscoe, M.D.
Harvard Medical School, Boston Children's Hospital

Dr. David M. Briscoe is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School, the Casey Lee Ball Chair in Transplantation, and Director of the Transplant Research Program at Boston Children's Hospital.

Transplantation is widely recognized as the treatment of choice for end stage organ disease. Nevertheless, despite significant advances in immunosuppressive therapeutics to prevent acute rejection, long-term graft survival remains suboptimal. For most transplanted organs, the rate of decline in function has not changed in over 20 years, and currently all grafts will eventually fail due to chronic rejection. Immunosuppressive agents have failed to reverse chronic allograft rejection, and, once established, supportive therapy is the best that can be currently offered to patients. Thus, long term success following transplantation will require greater understanding of responses that both promote and inhibit chronic allograft rejection.

Research in the Briscoe Laboratory focuses on intragraft mechanisms of transplant rejection. Dr. Briscoe's collaboration with Proteinsimple involves development of a Simple Plex assay for the measurements of predictive biomarkers of evolving chronic rejection. Assays are being developed using serum, plasma and urine from transplant recipients. We also plan to use biomarkers in future clinical trials focusing on the development of interruption therapeutics.

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Ella

Wes

Dr. Alan Holmes
University College London

Dr. Alan Holmes academic interests are centred on respiratory and cardiovascular diseases focusing on identifying pathogenic cellular mechanisms that contribute to diseases including pulmonary hypertension and tissue remodelling pathologies such as systemic sclerosis and IPF. The group have explored pharmacological approaches to modulate these processes in cell based assays and in vivo contexts. His group’s interest has recently focused on better understanding how biological barriers maintain tissue homeostasis and in turn their disruption can contribute to the development of human pathologies. This has led to identifying key cellular process where-by endothelial cells can differentiate into mesenchymal like cells (EndMT).

Dr. Alan Holmes is currently Head of Biology in the Drug Discovery Group, Translational Research Office at University College London. In this role his group facilitates the translation of UCL’s basic and clinical research discoveries into therapies. UCL and partner hospitals includes UCL-H, Royal Free Hospital, Great Ormond Street Hospital and Moorfields Eye Hospital, collectively these hospital serve in excess of 5 million people in the UK. This has led to a rich and dynamic environment of clinical research endeavours. Our group support the development of a broad range of biochemical and cellular assays to facilitate drug discovery programs as well as identify biomarkers to

Dr Holmes collaboration with Proteinsimple will aid the validation of robust protein markers to be used in the development of biomarkers and cellular assays ranging from cell signalling to disease relevant phenotypic assays in order to aid the progression of translational projects at UCL.

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Wes

Dr. Thomas Van De Ven
Duke University

Dr. Van De Ven is an Assistant Professor in the Duke University Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine and at the Durham VAMC. He is part of the new Center for Translational Pain Medicine (CTPM) and Director of the Nerve Injury and Pain Mechanism Laboratory.

Our lab is currently studying the biological mechanisms underlying the human response to nerve injury and surgery, in particular, the way injury induced neuroplasticity and inflammation often combine to cause chronic pain after surgery or trauma. We are using a systems biology approach to understand the molecular mechanisms of inflammation, focusing on nerve injury, chronic post-surgical pain, and the maladaptive processes involved in the transition from acute to chronic pain. We utilize reverse translational methodology, identifying pathways and targets of interest in human case-control studies, and subsequently validating those findings with animal models of nerve injury. This process focuses our research and improves our ability to discern clinically meaningful targets and future potential therapies.

Taking advantage of the uniquely quantitative, sensitive and high-throughput nature of Wes, we aim to correlate protein expression levels with the extensive clinical phenotypic data we've collected on patients (pain score, analgesic use, functional score), which will produce novel insights into the mechanisms of pain and regeneration, and provide therapeutic targets for future trials.

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Wes

FluorChem Imagers

Dr. Preston P. Garcia
Castleton University

Dr. Preston P. Garcia is an Associate Professor of Biology at Castleton University in Castleton, Vermont. He is also the Biology Program coordinator within the Natural Sciences Department at Castleton. Castleton is a small public undergraduate liberal arts institution. The awarding of the ProteinSimple equipment grant is transformative for our independent research as well as providing an added benefit for undergraduate laboratory teaching.

The FluorChem Imager is housed in our departmental Microbiology and Molecular Biology research lab shared between Dr. Garcia and Dr. Christine Palmer, Assistant Professor of Biology. The research in the Garcia lab focuses on the bacterial plant symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, specifically how the bacteria regulates of succinate metabolism. Many of the experiments in the lab consist of mutational screens with florescent tags, as well as monitoring the relationship with the plant host in real-time. The Palmer lab research is interested in how plants respond to the environment, from the molecular to physiological to ecological level. Her more recent work investigates how plants deal with metals in the environment with the goal of increasing human nutrition and cleaning up toxic metals from soils, as well as how plants respond to shaded environments to help us increase agricultural productivity. Together, they have also created a collaborative project to take advantage of both of their fields of expertise using a fluorescent microbial biosensor to compare phosphate uptake in modern corn versus its ancestor, teosinte.

The imager was put to use as soon as it arrived and everyone is extremely impressed with the ease and multi-functionality of the system.

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FluorChem Imagers

AlphaImager

Coming soon!

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AlphaImager